8th Annual Friday Harbor Film Festival

Filmmaker Q&A: ACTUALLY, ICONIC: RICHARD ESTES

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Stream began October 17, 2020 9:00 PM UTC
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Welcome to the ACTUALLY, ICONIC: RICHARD ESTES Livestream Q&A!


This is a recording of the live FILMMAKER Q&A ONLY and does NOT include the viewing of the film. Watch for free through October 31st!


PANELISTS: 

Olympia Stone, Director


LIVESTREAM FOCUS:

Olympia Stone is a filmmaker whose documentaries have been showcased nationally on public television and have won numerous festival awards. Olympia’s films probe the motivations and personal histories of extraordinary artists as a way of providing insight into their work. 


Olympia’s most recent film, Double Take: The Art of Elizabeth King, aired on public television in 2018 and won the Jury prize at the 2018 San Francisco DocFest. Her short film, The Original Richard McMahan, was showcased on WUNC-TVs Reel South series and premiered at the Tally Shorts Film Festival in January 2017, winning the Florida Favorite Award. In 2015, her documentary, Curious Worlds: The Art & Imagination of David Beck, premiered at the prestigious Full Frame Documentary Film Festival and aired on public television in the fall of 2016. Her first independent film, The Collector: Allan Stone’s Life in Art (2007), chronicles the obsessive collecting of her father, a New York art world gallerist whose habits and prescient scouting shaped his life and the lives of many in his artfully cluttered orbit. 

Olympia just completed her sixth documentary, titled Actually, Iconic: Richard Estes about the photorealist painter Richard Estes. She is currently working on a film about the reclusive outsider artist, Aldywth. 


ABOUT THE FILM

Admired by artists ranging from Salvador Dali to Chuck Close, Richard Estes is a humble icon of modern art. Despite having avoided media attention throughout his long career, he has been called the “king of photorealism,” a movement he helped launch in the late 1960’s. His break with abstract, non-representational art transformed modern painting. Now, at 87, he is ready to reveal the techniques and inspiration behind his art.