American Society of Landscape Architects Presents “My Garden of a Thousand Bees” and an Expert Discussion

Designing for Pollinators

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Stream began April 14, 2022 6:25 PM UTC
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Join the American Society of Landscape Architects for a free virtual screening of the new PBS Nature documentary, My Garden of a Thousand Bees, from 1:30-2:30pm ET followed by an expert discussion on Designing for Pollinators from 2:30-3:30pm ET.


The time to design for pollinators is now. Creating spaces that allow pollinator species to evolve is critical. Allowing for pollinator mobility, accessibility, connectivity, and the capacity to evolve and thrive is critical to the sustainable design of outdoor spaces. Panelists Patricia Algara, PLA, ASLA and Clay Bolt will explore this topic through a close examination of pollinator design. Among the topics discussed will be the impact of systemic pesticide contamination and the sourcing of plants from growers who are committed to not using systemic pesticides.


Speakers include:

Patricia Algara, PLA, American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA)

Patricia was born and raised in Mexico, she is the founder and president of award-winning BASE Landscape Architecture Inc. A recognized leader in sustainable design and community involvement, Patricia creates landscapes that immerse people of all backgrounds and abilities in learning, exploration and play. Patricia’s community involvement and advocacy expand the boundaries of traditional landscape architecture. She founded an NGO - With Honey in the Heart, that creates healthy habitats for pollinators. She has lectured at many universities and has won two national faculty ASLA awards. She received her MLA from UC Berkeley in 2007.


Clay Bolt, World Wildlife Fund (WWF)

Clay Bolt is a Natural History and Conservation Photographer specializing in the world's smaller creatures. Clay's photography appears in publications such as National Geographic Magazine, The New York Times, and National Wildlife Magazine. He is a Senior Fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers, a Fellow of the Linnean Society of London, and a past president of the North American Nature Photography Association. His work currently focuses on protecting North America's native bee species with a particular focus on threatened and endangered bumble bees. In 2017, he was a leading voice in the successful fight to protect the rusty-patched bumble bee under the Endangered Species Act—North America's first native bee to achieve this status. In 2019, Bolt became the first photographer to document a living Wallace's Giant Bee—the world's largest bee—as part of a four-person exploration team to rediscover the species in the Indonesian islands of North Maluku. 

Clay Bolt is the Senior Communications Lead for WWF's Northern Great Plains (NGP) Program where he supports efforts to protect the grasslands of the Great Plains, restore plains bison and black-footed ferrets, and support food sovereignty initiatives for the region's Native nations. Clay also provides communications support to the NGP program's Sustainable Ranching Initiative, which is committed to working with ranchers to restore croplands back to grasslands, improve management of intact grasslands, and protect grasslands with agreements that prevent conversion.

The time to design for pollinators is now. Creating spaces that allow pollinator species to evolve is critical. Allowing for pollinator mobility, accessibility, connectivity, and the capacity to evolve and thrive is critical to the sustainable design of outdoor spaces.


Panelists Patricia Algara, PLA, ASLA and Clay Bolt will explore this topic through a close examination of pollinator design. Among the topics discussed will be the impact of systemic pesticide contamination and the sourcing of plants from growers who are committed to not using systemic pesticides.